​​​​​​​


 

​​Facts and figures

The Wheatbelt covers an area of 154 862 square kilometres (96 226 square miles).

Commercial centres: Northam, Merredin

Distance from Northam to Perth: 96 km (60 miles)

Distance from Merredin to Perth: 260 km (161 miles)

Median house price in Merredin: $165 000 (June 2016)

Other main towns: Jurien Bay, Moora​


 

The Wheatbelt is well-known for its magnificent wildflowers as well as for its rich agricultural history in cropping – producing almost half of the agricultural crops for the State. It is the State’s main producer of cereal crops and other products such as canola, vegetables, honey, citrus fruits, olives, wine grapes and livestock. Its vibrant economy is supported by construction, the retail trade and fisheries. It also offers affordable housing and extensive education, health, cultural and recreational services.

Known as the Heartlands, the Wheatbelt offers you an escape from city life in a safe and relaxed environment with more than 200 towns and communities offering a range of liveability options. Some of the attractions in the region include the Narembeen Grain Discovery Centre, Wave Rock near Hyden and the Wagin Historical Village.

The Shire of Northam is the largest regional centre with population distributed throughout the region which boasts 150 km of a pristine coastline lucrative to the fishing industry, particularly rock lobsters for domestic consumption and export.

The Wheatbelt region belongs to a vast and surprisingly diverse region of outback Australia known as Western Australia’s Golden Outback.

 

Key fact!

Just outside the coastal town of Cervantes are the lunar-like Pinnacles (tall limestone pillars formed from seashells and from the natural forces of wind and water) which rise eerily out of the yellow desert sands of Nambung National Park where you can find the earliest life forms on earth – the stromatolites – at Lake Thetis.​

 

​​Image of the Wheatbelt region 

News

July 2020 invitation round for State Nominated Migration Program

7 July 2020

WA Migration Services is awaiting allocation of State nomination places from the Department of Home Affairs (Home Affairs) for the 2020-21 program year. Invitation rounds have been paused during this time.

We will continue to assess applications received. Nominations in SkillSelect from 1 July 2020 will be dependent on Home Affairs confirming allocation of places for the new program year.

WA Migration Services appreciates your patience and looks forward to progressing the State migration program as soon as possible.

Updates on future invitation rounds will be provided on the WA Migration Services website.

For more information on the invitation process visit the invitation rounds page.

Fun Fact
Aboriginal art – There are more than 10 000 ancient rock engravings, some dating back 10 000 years at the Burrup Peninsula, Dampier, Western Australia.